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Authorized Viasat™ Retailer

Get Rural is an authorized retailer of Viasat Internet services and related customer equipment. Viasat and Exede are trademarks and service marks of Viasat, Inc. Some content on this website may be copyrighted by Viasat, Inc.

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Return to Viasat Satellite Internet Glossary

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# A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Data:

Information in the form a computer or smart device like a cell phone can use. Whenever you access the internet you use data — whether it is browsing the web, playing a game, sending an email, streaming music or watching a video. Data is measured in bytes (see “bytes” below).

Data Allowance:

The amount of data your Viasat plan allows you to consume during your monthly billing cycle. The Viasat Data Allowance Policy outlines the amount of data your plan allows you to use.

Data Transfer Rate:

The data transfer rate is commonly used to measure how fast data is transferred from one location to another. For example, a hard drive may have a maximum data transfer rate of 480 Mbps, while your internet service provider (ISP) may offer an internet connection with a maximum data transfer rate of only 1.5 Mbps. Data transfer rates are typically measured in bits per second (bps).

Decompression:

The process of restoring compressed data to its original form. Decompression is considered important, as compressed data needs to be restored back to standard state for usage. A compressed file is any file that contains one or more files or directory that is smaller than their original file size. These files make downloading faster easier and allow more data to be stored on a removable media. Common compressed file extensions are .ZIP, .RAR, .ARJ, .TAR.GZ, and .TGZ. Decompression is widely used in data communications, multimedia, audio, video and file transmissions.

DHCP:

Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) is used to dynamically assign IP addresses to networked computers. The DHCP server waits for a computer to connect to it, then assigns it an IP address from a master list stored on the server. DHCP helps in setting up large networks, since IP addresses do not have to be manually assigned to each computer on the network. Because of the slick automation involved with DHCP, it is the most commonly used networking protocol.

Dial-up:

A dial-up connection uses a modem to connect to an internet service provider (ISP) or another computer. It uses standard analog phone lines to transfer data up to 56 Kbps. Before the year 2000, dial-up was the standard way to connect to the internet. However, most users now connect to the internet is via a Digital Subscriber Line (DSL), cable modem or satellite internet connection.

Digital Signature:

A digital signature is a block of data that can be attached to documents such as PDFs, word processing files and email messages. It contains a unique code that verifies a person’s identity. Many programs allow users to “digitally sign” documents, which appends a digital signature to the file. By using digital signatures, users can certify documents they have created or approve documents received from others.

Digital Subscriber Line (DSL):

The technology that provides internet access by sending digital data over a phone line. Do not confuse this with dial-up; DSL is much faster and will not tie up a phone line while you’re using the internet.

Depending on the DSL version, speed is based on the distance between the customer and telco central office or telephone junction box. DSL provides “always-on” operation. At the central office, DSL traffic is aggregated in a unit called the DSL Access Multiplexor (DSLAM) and forwarded to the appropriate ISP or data network.  DSL usually connect to your USB port, and some service providers offer modems at no charge or rolled into your subscription plan. Typically this internet service is provided by your local phone company.

Dish:

A dish is a device used to send and receive transmissions. Viasat’s dish (or antenna) is part of the equipment installed at your home or business and includes the satellite dish, mounting bracket and TRIA assembly. The actual Viasat dish is about 30 inches in diameter and connects to the modem inside your home via a coaxial cable. The dish is what allows the connection between the modem and Viasat’s satellite in space.

DNS:

The primary purpose of a Domain Name System (DNS) is to make finding websites easier. Websites are actually located by their IP addresses. For example, when you type “https://getruralsatellite.com” in your browser bar, your browser sends a request to the nearest DNS server, which finds the correct IP address for “getruralsatellite.com“. Your computer then attempts to connect to the server with that IP number. DNS is just another one of the many features of the internet that we take for granted. Without DNS, we would have to remember the IP address of every site we wanted to visit, instead of just the domain name. And speaking as someone who often forgets my age, this would not be fun. At all.

Domain Name:

Used to identify a website, businesses commonly have a domain name that is their name with the “.com” domain suffix after it. For example, our domain name is “getruralsatellite.com“. When you access a website on your web browser, the domain name is actually translated to a specific number called an IP address. This translation is performed by a system called DNS, which directs your browser to the appropriate location.

The domain suffix is the last part of a domain name. Common examples include “.com”, “.net” and “.org”; however, many others exist. For example, country-specific domain suffixes such as “.uk”, “.se” and “.jp” can be used to identify websites located in the United Kingdom, Sweden & Japan. Newer domain suffixes, such as “.tv” and “.mobi” are used to identify specific types of websites. For example, the “.tv” domain suffix is commonly used by television station websites. The “.mobi” suffix is used for mobile versions of websites that can easily be viewed on mobile devices.

Download:

This is the process in which data is sent to your computer, typically from another computer or from the internet. Whenever you receive information from the internet, you are downloading it to your computer. For example, you might have to download an upgrade for your computer’s operating system in order to play a new game (especially if you’re using Windows). Or you might need to download a demo version of a program you are thinking about buying from the software company’s website. The opposite of this process, sending information to another computer, is called uploading.

 Dropbox:

A file hosting service operated by American company Dropbox, Inc., that offers cloud storage, file synchronization, personal cloud and client software. Dropbox is a creative collaboration modern workspace designed to reduce busywork, bring your files together in one central place and safely sync them across all your devices, so you can access them anytime, anywhere. Dropbox offers features like a doc scanner, shared folders, offline access and more, make collaborating and sharing large with others simple.

DSL:

Digital Subscriber Line (DSL) is the technology that provides internet access by sending digital data over a phone line. Do not confuse this with dial-up; DSL is much faster and will not tie up a phone line while you’re using the internet. AT&T, CenturyLink, Frontier, Verizon, & Windstream are all examples of DSL internet service providers.

Depending on the DSL version, speed is based on the distance between the customer and telco central office or telephone junction box. DSL provides “always-on” operation. At the central office, DSL traffic is aggregated in a unit called the DSL Access Multiplexor (DSLAM) and forwarded to the appropriate ISP or data network.  DSL usually connect to your USB port, and some service providers offer modems at no charge or rolled into your subscription plan. Typically this internet service is provided by your local phone company.

Dual band:

The capability of wireless routers to transmit on the 5 GHz band and also the 2.4 GHz band. Unlike other wifi routers that only support one signal band, dual-band, dual-concurrent routers like the Viasat WiFi Gateway MODEM contain two different types of wireless that can support both 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz connections.

DVD:

Digital Versatile Disc (DVD) is a high-capacity optical disc that looks like a CD, but can store much more information. While a CD can store 650 to 700 MB of data, a single-layer, single-sided DVD can store 4.7 GB of data. This enables massive computer applications and full-length movies to be stored on a single DVD. To be able to read DVDs in your computer you will need a DVD-ROM drive.

DVD Quality:

480p video  is consideredDVD quality. 480p video is made up of 480 lines stacked one on top of another from top to bottom, with each line being 852 pixels wide. A 480p has a video screen resolution of 852 × 480 pixels. 480p is recommended for viewing DVDs and streaming video on most laptop and desktop monitors and standard (non HD) TVs. Households with multiple connected mobile devices and people who tend to stream video on their laptops, tablets or standard size TVs can stream most videos at 480p video screen resolution. Shows that don’t have a lot of fast action scenes or high-def graphics look just fine at 480p DVD quality.

# A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

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