Get Rural Satellite with Viasat Internet

X

Get Rural Internet
Authorized Viasat™ Retailer

Authorized Viasat™ Retailer

Get Rural is an authorized retailer of Viasat Internet services and related customer equipment. Viasat and Exede are trademarks and service marks of Viasat, Inc. Some content on this website may be copyrighted by Viasat, Inc.

X
Get Viasat internet plans & pricing
: * : *
: *
: * : * : *
*Required

Return to Viasat Satellite Internet Glossary

I

# A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

I/O Devices:

Input and output devices are collectively referred to as I/O devices.

ICF:

Internet Connection Firewall (ICF) is a Windows XP feature that protects computers connected to the internet from unauthorized access. When ICF is enabled, Windows keeps a log of incoming requests from other systems on the Internet. If the request is something the user has requested, like a web page, the transmission will not be affected. However, if the request is unsolicited and is not recognized by the system, the transmission will be dropped. This helps prevent intrusion by hackers or malicious software such as spyware. While ICF limits incoming traffic from the internet, it does not affect outgoing traffic. This means data sent from your computer is still vulnerable to viruses or other disruptions even when ICF is enabled. If you have multiple computers sharing the same internet connection via ICS, you can enable ICF for all the computers. However, you should enable ICF for the router or system connected directly to the internet connection, not for each individual system.

 iCloud:

A cloud storage and cloud computing service developed by Apple Inc. launched in 2011. The iCloud service provides its users with means to store data such as documents, notes, photos. music and more on remote servers, keeping all your files safe, up to date, and available wherever you are.  Files can be downloaded, shared and sent to other users via any iOS, macOS or Windows device.

iCloud is built into all Apple devices allowing users to better manage their Apple devices if lost or stolen. The iCloud service also provides the means to wirelessly back up iOS devices directly to the iCloud, instead of relying on manual backups to a host Mac or Windows computer using iTunes. It works automatically. All Apple users receive 5GB of iCloud storage free and can easily buy more storage at any time. Service users are also able to share photos, music and games instantly by linking accounts via AirDrop wireless.

ICMP:

When information is transferred over the internet, computer systems send and receive data using the TCP/IP protocol. If there is a problem with the connection, error and status messages regarding the connection are sent using Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP), which is part of the internet protocol. When one computer connects to another system over the internet (such as a home computer connecting to a web server to view a website), it may seem like a quick and easy process. While the connection may take place in a matter of seconds, there are many separate connections that must happen in order for the computers to successfully communicate with each other. In cases where there is a problem with the connection, ICMP can send back codes to your system explaining why a connection failed. These may be messages such as, “Network unreachable” for a system that is down, or “Access denied” for a secure, password-protected system. ICMP may also provide routing suggestions to help bypass unresponsive systems. While ICMP can send a variety of different messages, most are never seen by the user. Even if you do receive an error message, the software you are using, such as a web browser, has most likely already translated the message into simple (less technical) language you can understand.

ICS:

Internet Connection Sharing (ICS) allows multiple computers to connect to the internet using the same connection and IP address. For example, several computers in a household can connect to the same modem using a router. As long as the router is connected to the modem, every computer connected to the router is also connected to the internet. Network address translation (NAT) allows the computers to share the same IP address. ICS can also be done using software. Windows 98 and later, as well as Mac OS X, support internet connection sharing. This allows one system’s network settings to be modified, turning the computer into a gateway. Other computers on the same network can then use that computer’s internet connection. While it is possible to share an internet connection using software, using hardware (such as a router) for ICS is the easiest and most hassle-free solution.

IEEE:

The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) is a professional association with its corporate office in New York City and its operations center in Piscataway, New Jersey. It was formed from the amalgamation of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers and the Institute of Radio Engineers.

iHeartRadio:

A free broadcast and internet radio platform owned by iHeartMedia, Inc. iHeartRadio allows users to listen to thousands of live stations or create their own artist stations. This service available to use via the internet at the Official iHeartRadio.com website or as a mobile app.

IM:

Instant Message (IM) also known as “IMing” has become a popular way to communicate over the internet. Two people with the same IM client software like Facebook Messenger, Hangouts, Jabber, Skype & WhatsApp can type messages back & forth in a private online chat session. IM software allows users to build a list of friends or followers and displays other users that are currently online and available to chat. After seeing who is online, the user can open up a chat session with as many other people desired. Instant messaging can be a much more efficient way to communicate with others than sending multiple emails back and forth. For this reason, IMing has become a useful tool among friends and co-workers.

IMAP:

Internet Message Access Protocol (IMAP, pronounced “eye-map”) is a method of accessing email messages on a server without having to download them to your local hard drive. This is the main difference between IMAP and another popular email protocol called “POP3”, which requires users to download messages to their hard drive before reading them. The advantage of using an IMAP mail server is that users can check their email from multiple computers and always see the same messages. This is because the messages stay on the server until the user chooses to download them to a local drive or place them in the “Trash”. Most webmail systems are IMAP based, which allows people to access to both their sent & received messages no matter what computer or device they use to check their email.

Most email client programs such as Microsoft Outlook and Mac OS X Mail allow you to specify what kind of protocol your mail server uses. If you use your ISP’s mail service, you should check with them to find out if their mail server uses IMAP or POP3 mail. If you enter the wrong protocol setting, your email program will not be able to send or receive mail.

Inbox:

An inbox is the main folder that your incoming email gets stored in. Whether you check your mail through a webmail interface like gmail or use a program like Outlook or Mac OS X Mail, each downloaded message gets stored in your inbox. If you check your mail from a POP3 account using an -mail program, the messages are downloaded to the inbox on your local hard drive. However, if you use an IMAP mail server, your inbox is created on the server and therefore your messages are stored on the server online as well.

Because most people receive more mail than they can manage in one folder, it is common to create other folders to store your messages. After reading your messages, you may want to move them to other folders you have created (such as “Family”, “Friends”, “Work,” etc.) or delete them by moving them to the “Trash”. However you decide to manage you email, it is a good idea to keep the number of messages in your inbox from growing too large and always keep your messages organized.

Input:

Whenever you enter data into your computer, it is referred to as “input”. This can be text typed in a word processing document, keywords entered in a search engine’s search box or data entered into a spreadsheet. Input can be something as simple as moving the mouse or clicking the mouse button or it can be as complex as scanning a document or downloading photos from a digital camera or smart device. Devices such as the keyboard, mouse, scanner and web cam are all considered input devices. This is because they allow the user to input data into the computer.

NOTE: The opposite of input is output, which is what the computer produces based on user input.

Input Device:

An input device is any device that provides input to a computer or smart device. There are dozens of possible input devices, but the two most common ones are a keyboard and mouse. Every key you press on the keyboard and every movement or click you make with the mouse sends a specific input signal to the computer. These commands allow you to open programs, type messages, drag objects and perform many other functions on your computer or device.

Input devices are a vital part of every computer system. While most computers come with a keyboard and mouse, other input devices may also be used to send information to the computer. Some examples include joysticks, MIDI keyboards, microphones, scanners, digital cameras, webcams, card readers, UPC scanners and scientific measuring equipment. All these devices send information to the computer and therefore are categorized as input devices. Input devices include any audio and video devices that record movies and sound, media discs that install software and even the internet, which is used to download files and receive data such as email or instant messages (IMs).

NOTE: Peripherals that output data from the computer are called output devices. Input and output devices are collectively referred to as I/O devices.

Instagram:

A free, online photo-sharing application and social network platform that was acquired by Facebook in 2012. Instagram allows users to capture, edit and upload photos and short videos through a mobile app.

Instant Message (IM):

Also known as “IMing” has become a popular way to communicate over the internet. Two people with the same IM client software like Facebook Messenger, Hangouts, Jabber, Skype & WhatsApp can type messages back & forth in a private online chat session. IM software allows users to build a list of friends or followers and displays other users that are currently online and available to chat. After seeing who is online, the user can open up a chat session with as many other people desired. Instant messaging can be a much more efficient way to communicate with others than sending multiple emails back and forth. For this reason, IMing has become a useful tool among friends and co-workers.

Interface:

Port on a hardware device that allows it to connect to another device. Common hardware interfaces found on computers include USB, Firewire and Ethernet connections. Other electronic devices may use different interfaces, such as HDMI connections on a TV or MIDI ports on a digital piano. The term “interface” may also refer to a user interface.

Internet Connection Firewall (ICF):

A Windows XP feature that protects computers connected to the internet from unauthorized access. When ICF is enabled, Windows keeps a log of incoming requests from other systems on the Internet. If the request is something the user has requested, like a web page, the transmission will not be affected. However, if the request is unsolicited and is not recognized by the system, the transmission will be dropped. This helps prevent intrusion by hackers or malicious software such as spyware. While ICF limits incoming traffic from the internet, it does not affect outgoing traffic. This means data sent from your computer is still vulnerable to viruses or other disruptions even when ICF is enabled. If you have multiple computers sharing the same internet connection via ICS, you can enable ICF for all the computers. However, you should enable ICF for the router or system connected directly to the internet connection, not for each individual system.

Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP):

When information is transferred over the internet, computer systems send and receive data using the TCP/IP protocol. If there is a problem with the connection, error and status messages regarding the connection are sent using ICMP, which is part of the internet protocol. When one computer connects to another system over the internet (such as a home computer connecting to a web server to view a website), it may seem like a quick and easy process. While the connection may take place in a matter of seconds, there are many separate connections that must happen in order for the computers to successfully communicate with each other. In cases where there is a problem with the connection, ICMP can send back codes to your system explaining why a connection failed. These may be messages such as, “Network unreachable” for a system that is down, or “Access denied” for a secure, password-protected system. ICMP may also provide routing suggestions to help bypass unresponsive systems. While ICMP can send a variety of different messages, most are never seen by the user. Even if you do receive an error message, the software you are using, such as a web browser, has most likely already translated the message into simple (less technical) language you can understand.

Internet Explorer:

Internet Explorer also known as “IE” is a series of graphical web browsers developed by Microsoft and included in the Microsoft Windows line of operating systems, starting in 1995. Internet Explorer was first released as part of an add-on package for Windows 95. Later versions were available as free downloads, or in service packs, and included in the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) service releases of Windows 95 and later versions of Windows. The browser is discontinued, but still maintained.

Internet Message Access Protocol (IMAP):

Pronounced “eye-map” IAMP is a method of accessing email messages on a server without having to download them to your local hard drive. This is the main difference between IMAP and another popular email protocol called “POP3”, which requires users to download messages to their hard drive before reading them. The advantage of using an IMAP mail server is that users can check their email from multiple computers and always see the same messages. This is because the messages stay on the server until the user chooses to download them to a local drive or place them in the Trash. Most webmail systems are IMAP based, which allows people to access to both their sent & received messages no matter what computer or device they use to check their email.

Most email client programs such as Microsoft Outlook and Mac OS X Mail allow you to specify what kind of protocol your mail server uses. If you use your ISP’s mail service, you should check with them to find out if their mail server uses IMAP or POP3 mail. If you enter the wrong protocol setting, your email program will not be able to send or receive mail.

Internet Protocol Security (IPsec) VPN:

The process of creating and managing Virtual Private Network (VPN) connections or services using an IPsec protocol suite. The IPsec VPN enables devices with an internet connection to establish a secure remote-access VPN connection between an individual device (servers, desktops, laptops and mobile devices) with the web browser through the IPsec VPN gateway. It is uses a secure means of creating VPN through a set of protocols, like cryptography that provides IPsec bundled security features to VPN network packets for Internet Protocol. An IPsec VPN requires the installation of specialized client software on the end user’s computer. Also known as VPN over IPsec or IP Security.

Internet Service Provider (ISP):

A company that provides internet service, such as Viasat, Exede, HughesNet, Charter, Comcast, Cox, Time Warner, etc.

iOS:

Pronounced “eye-oh-es”, iOS is Apple’s mobile operating system that runs on the iPhone & iPad. It has a graphical user interface (GUI) that is optimized for touchscreen devices. For example, the iOS home screen displays several icons, which are arranged in a static grid. Each application or “app” can be opened by simply tapping the the icon, rather than double-clicking the icon, like a desktop OS. iOS supports third party apps developed by other software developers. These apps can be downloaded from Apple’s App Store either directly from an iOS device or through iTunes on a Mac or PC. Unlike Google’s Android operating system, iOS does not support the installation of apps from outside the official app store.

IP Address:

An IP (Internet Protocol) address, also known as an “IP number” or simply an “IP”, is a numerical label assigned to any device connected to the internet. Your IP address is automatically assigned by your internet server provider (ISP) and may change from day to day, unless you have a persistent IP address (available with Viasat Business service).

IPsec VPN:

Internet protocol security (IPsec) VPN refers to the process of creating and managing Virtual Private Network connections or services using an IPsec protocol suite. The IPsec VPN enables devices with an internet connection to establish a secure remote-access VPN connection between an individual device (servers, desktops, laptops and mobile devices) with the web browser through the IPsec VPN gateway. It is uses a secure means of creating VPN through a set of protocols, like cryptography that provides IPsec bundled security features to VPN network packets for Internet Protocol. An IPsec VPN requires the installation of specialized client software on the end user’s computer. Also known as VPN over IPsec or IP Security.

ISP:

Internet Service Provider (ISP), such as Viasat, Exede, HughesNet, Charter, Comcast, Cox, Time Warner, etc.

# A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Share this page on your favorite social sites in 1-easy-click below!